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General Surgery

General Surgery

At Kinvara Private Hospital we specialise in providing hernia repair under local anaesthesia. A full range of hernia repair is offered using either local or general anaesthesia. 

Kinvara Private Hospital offers a range of general surgery, including hernia repair, gall bladder removal, haemorrhoids, fistula and pilonidal sinus removal. Book a consultation with our specialist surgeons.

Hernia Repair

About
Weak spots can develop in the layer of muscle in the abdominal wall, resulting in the contents of the abdomen pushing through. This produces a lump called a hernia. An inguinal hernia occurs at the inguinal canal. This is a narrow passage in which blood vessels pass through the abdominal wall.

A hernia can be dangerous due to structures within the abdomen, including the intestines, being trapped and the blood supply being cut off. Surgery should prevent serious complications from arising.

Procedure
Inguinal hernias can be repaired using keyhole surgery and usually takes approximately forty five minutes.

An incision is made along the groin and the ‘hernial sac’ is removed. The muscle layer is strengthen with stitches, and usually a synthetic mesh is inserted to cover the weak spot.

Recovery
You should be able to go home the same day. Movement and walking should be gradually increased over the first few days.  You should be able to return to work after two to four weeks, depending on how much surgery you require and the nature of your work.

Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, please ask our team or your GP for advice.

The hernia can return.

About
An epigastric hernia is where fat pushes through a weakness in the wall of the abdomen between the umbilicus (belly button) and sternum, which forms a lump. 

It is a common condition caused by a weakness in the abdominal wall between the umbilicus and sternum. If left untreated, an epigastric hernia can cause serious complications. Surgery can help to relieve pain that is caused by the hernia, and the hernia will be removed.

Procedure
The procedure is usually performed under general anaesthetic and only takes approximately thirty minutes.

The surgeon will make a cut over the hernia and free up the ‘hernial sac’. If only fat is pushing through, this will either be removed or pushed back. If contents of the abdomen are also pushing through, the contents will be placed back inside the abdomen.

The weak spot will be closed with strong stitches or for larger hernias, using a synthetic mesh.

Recovery
You should be able to go home the same day. Movement and walking should be gradually increased over the first few days. You should be able to return to work after one to two weeks, depending on how much surgery you require and the nature of your work. Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, please ask our team or your GP for advice.

The hernia can return.

About
There is a natural weakness in the wall of the abdomen at the umbilicus, or belly button. This is caused by development in the womb. If the contents of the abdomen push through, this produces a lump called a hernia.
A hernia can be dangerous because structures within your abdomen, inclduing the intestines, can become trapped and their blood supply cut off. Surgery can help to relieve pain that is caused by the hernia, and the hernia will be removed.

Procedure
The operation is usually performed under a general anaesthetic and usually takes approximately thirty minutes. An incision is made near umbilicus and the ‘hernial sac’ is removed. The muscle layer is strengthen with stitches, and usually a synthetic mesh is inserted to cover the weak spot.

In children under the age of about four, umbilical hernias tend to close. For older children and adults, the hernia will not get better without surgery.

Recovery
You should be able to go home the same day. Movement and walking should be gradually increased over the first few days. You should be able to return to work after two to four weeks, depending on how much surgery you require and the nature of your work.
Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, please ask our team or your GP for advice.
The hernia can come back.

About
A femoral hernia occurs where the femoral artery and vein pass from the abdomen into the leg. If left untreated, an femoral hernia can cause serious complications. A hernia can be dangerous due to structures within the abdomen, including the intestines, being trapped and the blood supply being cut off. Surgery should prevent serious complications from arising.

Procedure
The procedure is usually performed under general anaesthetic and only takes approximately forty five minutes. The surgeon will make a cut directly above or a little higher up than the hernia and free the ‘hernial sac’. The hole through which the contents of the abdomen passed, or femoral canal, will be narrowed.

The weak spot will be closed with strong stitches or for larger hernias, using a synthetic mesh.

Recovery
You should be able to go home the same day. Movement and walking should be gradually increased over the first few days. You should be able to return to work after two to four weeks, depending on how much surgery you require and the nature of your work. Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, please ask our team or your GP for advice.
The hernia can return.

About
An incisional hernia is a weakness in the abdominal wall which occurs when previous wounds do not heal properly. If left untreated, an incisional hernia can cause serious complications. Any procedure performed on the abdomen requires an incision that is closed using stitches. Occasionally the wound does not heal properly, resulting in the contents of the abdomen pushing through. This produces a lump called a hernia. A hernia can be dangerous due to structures within the abdomen, including the intestines, being trapped and the blood supply being cut off. Surgery should prevent serious complications from arising.

Procedure
The procedure usually takes approximately ninety minutes. The Surgeon will make an incision through the scar, repair the weak tissue using stitches or a synthetic mesh, which is stitched to the muscles.

Recovery
You should be able to go home after one to four days. Movement and walking should be gradually increased over the first few days. You should be able to return to work after two to four weeks, depending on how much surgery you require and the nature of your work. Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, please ask our team or your GP for advice.
The hernia can return.

About
A spigelian hernia is a hernia through the spigelian fascia, or layer of tissue, that separates two groups of abdominal muscles, the rectus muscles and the lateral obliques. If left untreated, a spigelian hernia can block a portion of the bowel or cut off the blood supply to other organs and tissue. This condition can be life-threatening.

Procedure
This procedure is minimally invasive. A laparoscopic hernia repair uses a small incision to guide a tube and a camera into the abdomen. With the assistance of the camera, the hernia is located and a synthetic mesh or stitches are used to repair the weakened abdominal wall.

Recovery
You should be able to go home after one to four days. Movement and walking should be gradually increased over the first few days. You should be able to return to work after two to four weeks, depending on how much surgery you require and the nature of your work. Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, please ask our team or your GP for advice.
The hernia can return.

About
A sports hernia, or athletic pubalgia, is a soft tissue injury that occurs in the groin area. It most often occurs during sports that require sudden changes of direction or intense twisting. It is a strain or tear of any soft tissue, such as muscle, tendon, or ligament, in the lower abdomen or groin area.

Procedure
This procedure is minimally invasive. A laparoscopic hernia repair uses a small incision to guide a tube and a camera into the abdomen. With the assistance of the camera, the hernia is located and a synthetic mesh or stitches are used to repair the weakened tissue. Some cases of sports hernia require the cutting of a small nerve in the groin, the inguinal nerve, to relieve pain. This procedure is called an inquinal neurectomy.

Recovery
You should be able to go home after one to four days. Movement and walking should be gradually increased over the first few days. You should be able to return to work after two to four weeks, depending on how much surgery you require and the nature of your work. Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, please ask our team or your GP for advice. It may be six to twelve weeks before a return to sports is possible.

Gall Bladder Removal

Cholecystectomy (Key hole)
Cholecystectomy (open surgery)

Haemorrhoids, Fistula and Pilonidal Sinus Removal

Anal fistula removal
Haemorrhoid removal
Pilondial sinus surgery

Other Procedures

Elective diagnostic laparoscopy
Removal of benign skin lesions

Speak to a member of our team for further information or to arrange a consultation

Our phone lines are open Monday to Friday 10am – 5pm. Alternatively you can send us a message via our contact form below.

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Possible Risks

As with any surgical procedure, risks should be considered, and the decision to undergo hernia surgery should not be made hastily. Risks include

Pain,

Bleeding,

Infection – should an infection arise then treatment with antibiotics or further surgery may be necessary. The risk of infection is rare,

Scars / poor scarring – some patients are prone to raised, thick scars,

Blood clots,

Developing a collection of blood or fluid,

Injury to structures within the abdomen,

Injury to nerves,


Difficulty passing urine,

Skin necrosis,

Removal of the umbilicus (belly button).
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Pricing & Finance

When you’re considering a cosmetic procedure, there’s a lot to think about – the choice of treatments available, the results you want to achieve, the recovery time, any potential risks and, of course, the cost.

Logo accreditations

Kinvara Private Hospital is registered with the Care Quality Commission. Cosmetic surgery results and benefits can vary and are different for each individual. As such, we cannot guarantee specific results.

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